Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 136--142

Traumatic optic neuropathy management: A Survey assessment of current practice patterns


Colin Bacorn1, Megan V Morisada2, Raj D Dedhia3, Toby O Steele2, Edward Bradley Strong2, Lily Koo Lin1 
1 Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, University of California Davis Health Eye Center, Sacramento, California
2 Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Health, Sacramento, California
3 Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA

Correspondence Address:
Lily Koo Lin
University of California Davis Health Eye Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 2400 Sacramento
California

Introduction: The treatment of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is highly controversial with a lack of substantiated evidence to support the use of corticosteroids or surgical decompression of the optic nerve. The aim of the study was to determine if there was a general consensus in the management of TON despite controversy in the literature. Methods: An anonymous survey of members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society regarding their practice patterns in the management of patients with TON was performed. Results: The majority of 165 respondents indicated that they treated TON with corticosteroids (60%) while a significant minority (23%) performed surgical interventions (P < 0.0001). Subgroup analysis comparing rates of treatment with steroids among oculoplastic surgeons and neuro-ophthalmologists (67% vs. 47%) was not significant (Fisher's Exact test [FET], P =0.11) while results did suggest that a higher proportion of oculoplastic surgeons (33%) than neuro-ophthalmologists (11%) recommended surgical intervention (FET, P =0.004). In cases where visual acuity exhibited a downward trend treatment with steroids was the most commonly employed management. In general, neuro-ophthalmologists trended toward observation over treatment in TON patients with stable visual acuity while oculoplastic surgeons favored treatment with corticosteroids. Conclusions: In spite of the lack of class I evidence supporting intervention of TON, the majority of respondents were inclined to offer corticosteroid treatment to patients whose visual acuity showed progressive decline following injury.


How to cite this article:
Bacorn C, Morisada MV, Dedhia RD, Steele TO, Strong EB, Lin LK. Traumatic optic neuropathy management: A Survey assessment of current practice patterns.J Emerg Trauma Shock 2021;14:136-142


How to cite this URL:
Bacorn C, Morisada MV, Dedhia RD, Steele TO, Strong EB, Lin LK. Traumatic optic neuropathy management: A Survey assessment of current practice patterns. J Emerg Trauma Shock [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Nov 27 ];14:136-142
Available from: https://www.onlinejets.org/article.asp?issn=0974-2700;year=2021;volume=14;issue=3;spage=136;epage=142;aulast=Bacorn;type=0