Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock

SYMPOSIUM
Year
: 2008  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 88--96

Pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia


James R Meredith1, Kelly P O'Keefe2, Sagar Galwankar3 
1 Department of Otolaryngology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
2 Department of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
3 Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
James R Meredith
Department of Otolaryngology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
USA

Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is an evolving field in pediatric emergency medicine. As new drugs breach the boundaries of anesthesia in the Pediatric Emergency Department, parents, patients, and physicians are finding new and more satisfactory methods of sedation. Short acting, rapid onset agents with little or no lingering effects and improved safety profiles are replacing archaic regimens. This article discusses the warning signs and areas of a patient«SQ»s medical history that are particularly pertinent to procedural sedation and the drugs used. The necessary equipment is detailed to provide the groundwork for implementing safe sedation in children. It is important for practitioners to familiarize themselves with a select few of the PSA drugs, rather than the entire list of sedatives. Those agents most relevant to PSA in the pediatric emergency department are presented.


How to cite this article:
Meredith JR, O'Keefe KP, Galwankar S. Pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia.J Emerg Trauma Shock 2008;1:88-96


How to cite this URL:
Meredith JR, O'Keefe KP, Galwankar S. Pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia. J Emerg Trauma Shock [serial online] 2008 [cited 2022 Oct 4 ];1:88-96
Available from: https://www.onlinejets.org/article.asp?issn=0974-2700;year=2008;volume=1;issue=2;spage=88;epage=96;aulast=Meredith;type=0